History of Multicultural Childrens Literature

SAMPLE EXCERPT:

The Social Justice Resources Center at Virginia Teach and the Smithsonian Museum worked together to create a bibliography in the 1990s that might serve as an outreach to parents, legislators, and educators, in hopes to choose culturally sensitive and historically accurate books about Native-Americans.

Asian-American literature arrived much later to the forefront of the academic and commercial scene than other demographics, particularly as a result of the hateful history of the Japanese-Americans during World War II. The United States, eager to recover its image after imprisonment saga, wanted to encourage success amongst Japanese-Americans, but were not won't to do is as quickly as they were with the African-Americans and women. The late 1990s brought the real rise of Asian-American literature, although the 1980s and 1990s saw, like the other subgroups, a rise of Asian-American oriented literature in homogenous communities. Fork Lane School in Hicksville, New York, was one of these schools, where more children were Asian than European in descent.

The school developed a curriculum that focuses on language arts, fine arts, and short stories to integrate the Asian-American characters into the standard stories of America, as well as learn to identify Asian countries and characteristics, create origami and painted words, as well as the myths and stories of the Asian traditions. Most of the books used in the segment, since adopted by many other schools across the nation, include The Sea of Gold and Other Tales from Japan, Rise and Shine Mariko-chan, and The Tale of the Mandarin Ducks. While many of these stories embrace Asian history, they breakdown in explaining the transition of peoples from Asia to the Americas, leaving a gaping hole in the knowledge base of Asian-American literature for children.

Ultimately, the incorporation of multicultural children's literature into the popular American library has been a story of civil rights, historical trends, and individual agency. While the African-American youth literary arrival was part of a larger movement, other demographics, such as Asian-Americans, have used literary inclusion as a movement in and of itself. The last ten years has seen a strict change in how literary publishers approach multiculturalism with children, as seen by the American Girls production line, with not only a story of an African-American, a Native American, an Asian-American, a Hispanic-American, and a European-American, but also the stories of a Jewish-American and a rather inclusive many-cultured American, in addition to the recent addition of the Scholastic "Dear America," series. Ultimately, the multicultural truths of the American society are finding their way through laws, popular understandings, and into children's literature.

Baker, Gwendolyn. "Policy Issues in Multicultural Education in the United States." The Journal of Negro Education. Vol. 48, No. 3. (Summer, 1979.)

Caldwell-Wood and Mitten, N. And L. "I is not for Indian." Multicultural Review. Vol. 1, Iss. 2, 1993.

Eldering, Lotty. "Multiculturalism and Multicultural Education in an International Perspective." Anthropology & Education Quarterly. Vol. 27, No. 3. (Sep., 1996)

Farr and Remi, Michael and Georges. TinTin: The Complete Companion. New York: Last Gasp, 2002.

Mukai, Gary. Elementary Literature Series, Part 1: Cooperation in Japan. Stanford, CA: SPICE Press, 1990.

Baker, Gwendolyn. "Policy Issues in Multicultural Education in the United States." The Journal of Negro Education. Vol. 48, No. 3. (Summer, 1979.)

Caldwell-Wood and Mitten, N. And L. "I is not for Indian." Multicultural Review. Vol. 1, Iss. 2, 1993.

Eldering, Lotty. "Multiculturalism and Multicultural Education in an International Perspective." Anthropology & Education Quarterly. Vol. 27, No. 3. (Sep., 1996)

Farr and Remi, Michael and Georges. TinTin: The Complete Companion. New York: Last Gasp, 2002.

Mukai, Gary. Elementary Literature Series, Part 1: Cooperation in Japan. Stanford, CA: SPICE Press, 1990.

Farr and Remi, Michael and Georges. TinTin: The Complete Companion. New York: Last Gasp, 2002. p. 21.

Ibid, p. 45.

Ibid, p. 45.

Ibid, p. 47.

Eldering, Lotty. "Multiculturalism and Multicultural Education in an International Perspective." Anthropology & Education Quarterly. Vol. 27, No. 3. (Sep., 1996) p. 315.

Ibid, p. 326.

Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute. "American Maid: Growing up Female in Life and Literature." Vol. III. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1997.

Ibid.

Ibid.

Baker, Gwendolyn. "Policy Issues in Multicultural Education in the United States." The Journal of Negro Education. Vol.…