Transition Theory a Discussion of

SAMPLE EXCERPT:

Differences occur when an individual feels differently, especially when he or she feels as if he or she is perceived as different, or is seeing the world and others in different ways. Another facet, time span may be characterized as flowing and moving over a period of time. This is executed when an individual is moving through a period of instability, confusion and distress, but which will lead to an 'ending' and, once again, calm.

There are various points in the transition process that cannot be classified by types of processes. These are critical points and events, and are defined by 'markers' such as birth, death, the cessation of menstruation or the diagnosis of an illness. These critical points and events are usually associated with increasing awareness of changes or differences, or more active engagement in dealing with transition experiences. There are also transition conditions that come into play at such times, which especially influence the way a person moves through a transition and may facilitate or hinder progress toward achieving a healthy transition. These conditions include personal community, or societal factors that may facilitate or obstruct the process and outcomes of healthy transition.

It is important to recognize this latter point made, in light of critical points and events. For instance, in order for the project to work, and in order to implement transition theory successfully, one must first and foremost think about the kind of transitions an individual has experience, and generalize to include a community which one can help. In the case of African-American mothers whose lives have been altered by some sort of violence, it is important to recognize and speak about these critical points, but it is also vital to be aware of transition conditions, with a stress upon how community can get involved in the healing process. Lastly, in order to successfully implement such a process, one must understand the transitions on a personal level, as well as personal and community patterns of response.

One must check, firstly, whether outcome indicators are healthy, and whether the community is indeed one in which the said individual can grow and heal properly. Nursing indicators can help in this case greatly. This concept involves three measures that are applicable to the therapeutic intervention during transitions. The first is Assessment of Readiness, which requires a comprehensive understanding of the client. This is done by assessing each transition condition in order to create client readiness. The second measure is preparation for transition by using education as the primary method for creating optimal conditions in preparation for transition. The third measure is role supplementation, a facet introduced solely by Meleis in 1975, which is essentially taking on other roles.

Further Development of Transition Theory

The previous sections have described transition theory and have explained, in a rudimentary fashion, both an overall application, as well as a specific application to the case at hand. There are, of course, many more studies that must be done, and much research undertaken before one can truly apply this theory successfully to the said community. However, further development of transition theory must also be undertaken.

Though the theory addresses many facets of the changes that an individual can undergo, it does not specifically address or focus on the mental changes that take place when change occurs. For instance, there are many chemical changes that take place in one's body in the aftermath of a shock as that caused by violence which kills a child, as would be the case in the African-American community, which this study seeks to examine. A mother would need to cope with this transition from having a son or daughter to losing them and no longer having the child around. For this reason, such a mother would need to understand that though a change is taking place, there are ways to cope. She would need to be examined only if ready to speak about the events that occurred, yet transition theory does not give guidance as to how such a development would actually take place.

In essence, what transition theory does very well is explain the different stages of change, but does not provide clear guidance as to how to address a specific stage, and especially not from a psychological standpoint, which is an area that would need much work in this study, and which could potentially be supplemented by other theories.

Conclusions

Needless to say, Transition Theory has its merits, despite some shortcomings, and can be applied to a variety of other fields, if amended. This theory is useful because there are many changes that can happen in one's life. For instance, as stated in one study, "changes in health and illness of individuals create a process of transition, and clients in transition tend to be more vulnerable to risks that may in turn affect their health. Uncovering these risks may be enhanced by understanding the transition process. As a central concept of nursing, transition has been analyzed, its components identified, and a framework to articulate and to reflect the relationship between these components has been defined."

However, in order to progress, this process must be refined, and finally, implemented and tailored to a variety of circumstance, as well as based on specific individuals. It is only through further study and individualized research that this theory can work well.

Works Cited:

Chipman, K. (1998). "Violence in the African-American Community as a Public Issue." University of Daytona School of Law. Retrieved December 30, 2011, from .

Marriner-Tomey, A., & Alligood, M.R. (2006). -- source provided by customer.

Meleis, A.I. (2010). "Transitions Theory: Middle Range and Situation Specific Theories in Nursing Research and Practice." Springer Publishing: New York.

Meleis, A.I., & Sawyer, L.M., & Im, E., & Hilfinger Messias, D.K., & Schumacher, K. (2000).Experiencing Transitions: An Emerging Middle-Range Theory. Advances in Nursing Science, 23(1).

Walker, D. (2009). "Why Youth Violence still Plagues Black Communities." New America Media. Retrieved December 30, 2011, from .

Chipman, K. (1998). "Violence in the African-American Community as a Public Issue." University of Daytona School of Law. Retrieved December 30, 2011, from .

Walker, D. (2009). "Why Youth Violence still Plagues Black Communities." New America Media. Retrieved December 30, 2011, from .

Marriner-Tomey, A., & Alligood, M.R. (2006). -- source provided by customer.

Ibrahim Meleis, A. (2010). "Transitions Theory: Middle Range and Situation Specific Theories in Nursing Research and Practice." Springer Publishing: New York.

Ibrahim, p. xiiii.

Ibrahim, p. xiii.

Note: Customer provided notes from the text for the course, which were referenced throughout this section.

Customer-provided reference.

Customer-provided references.

Meleis, Afaf Ibrahim PhD, FAAN; Sawyer, Linda M. PhD, RN; Im, Eun-Ok PhD, RN; Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne K. PhD, RN; Schumacher, Karen PhD, RN. (2000).Experiencing Transitions: An Emerging Middle-Range Theory. Advances in Nursing Science, 23(1).